Bladder Repair (For Incontinence)

Bladder Repair for Incontinence is to repair a leakage of urine that happens when you are active or when there is pressure on your pelvic area. Walking or doing other exercise, lifting, coughing, sneezing, and laughing can all cause stress incontinence. Bladder Repair Surgery can correct this problem. Your Surgeon can operate on the ligaments and other body tissues that hold your bladder or urethra in place.

Preparation for Bladder Repair (For Incontinence)

Your health care provider will talk to you about how to prepare for surgery. He may tell you not to eat or drink anything after midnight on the day of your surgery. He will tell you what medications to take or not take on the day of your surgery before surgery; you will need to obtain clearance from your regular doctor if you have medical problems. You may be required to obtain some basic tests for screening before the surgery. Basic blood tests, a chest x-ray, and an EKG may be required depending on your health.

Surgery

General anesthesia usually is used during repair of the bladder and urethra. Unless another health problem is present that would require an abdominal incision, the bladder and urethra are usually repaired through an incision in the wall of the vagina. This surgery pulls together the loose or torn tissue in the area of prolapse in the bladder or urethra and strengthens the wall of the vagina. This prevents prolapse from recurring.

There are several types of surgery to correct stress urinary incontinence. These surgeries lift the urethra and/or bladder into their normal position.

Recovery

You may stay in the hospital from 1 to 2 days. You may go home with a catheter in place. You can most likely return to your normal activities in about 6 weeks. Avoid strenuous activity, such as heavy lifting or long periods of standing, for the first 3 months, and increase your activity level gradually. Straining or lifting after you have resumed normal activities may cause the problem to recur.

Most women are able to resume sexual intercourse in less than 6 weeks. Urinary function usually returns to normal in 2 to 6 weeks.

Risks

Like any surgical procedure, urinary incontinence surgery comes with risks. Although uncommon, potential complications may include:

  • Temporary difficulty urinating and incomplete bladder emptying (urinary retention)
  • Development of overactive bladder, which could include urge incontinence
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Difficult or painful intercourse

Talk with your doctor to understand possible risks and benefits of surgery.

Procedure Cost: 4755.00
CPT 57288